Readers may remember CCN’s coverage of PaidBooks.com, a site run by the friendly folks behind Bitcoin Aliens. It has the same functionality as a regular faucet, but instead pays users for reading classic books. It is one of the more interesting and engaging methods of giving away free money, as it gives the user the opportunity to engage in more ways than simply getting around a CAPTCHA and pressing a couple of buttons. Since we first wrote about PaidBooks, they seem to have converted to Bitcoin Cash via a service called AirDrips. BCH is easily converted to Bitcoin, if desired, via services like ShapeShift. You create an accout at AirDrips and then you are able to read books and get paid. They also offer other similar things such as watching videos for money.
Deloitte AG is an affiliate of Deloitte NWE LLP, a member firm of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee (“DTTL”). DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL and Deloitte NWE LLP do not provide services to clients. Please see About Deloitte for a more detailed description of DTTL and its member firms.
One of Bitcoin’s most appealing features is its ruthless verification process, which greatly minimizes the risk of fraud. Since Bitcoin is decentralized, volunteers—referred to as “miners”—constantly verify and update the blockchain. Once a specific amount of transactions are verified, another block is added to the blockchain and business continues per usual.

Double spending means, as the name suggests, that a Bitcoin user is illicitly spending the same money twice. With physical currency, this isn't an issue: Once you hand someone a greenback $20 bill to buy a bottle of vodka, you no longer have it, so there's no danger you could use that same $20 to buy lotto tickets next door. With digital currency, however, as the Investopedia dictionary explains, "there is a risk that the holder could make a copy of the digital token and send it to a merchant or another party while retaining the original."
Transactions are verified by network nodes through cryptography and recorded in a public distributed ledger called a blockchain. Bitcoin was invented by an unknown person or group of people using the name Satoshi Nakamoto[9] and released as open-source software in 2009.[10] Bitcoins are created as a reward for a process known as mining. They can be exchanged for other currencies,[11] products, and services. Research produced by the University of Cambridge estimates that in 2017, there were 2.9 to 5.8 million unique users using a cryptocurrency wallet, most of them using bitcoin.[12]
×