in the early years of the 2oth Century, the Gold Reserve Banks of America and Europe became the property of these greedy Bankers in American and Europe, no longer owned or controlled by the US or any European country, they became the willing puppets of the Oligarch Regime. These Oligarchs did away with “paying gold to the bearer on demand” because it was now their gold! Paper currency isn’t worth anything, even the paper it is printed on, in fact, paper currency has become plastic currency in many different forms like your credit cards!
Blockchain is the underlying technology for digital currency like Bitcoin, Litecoin, and Ethereum and other digital properties. The technology records every transaction of a digital currency or property in a database or digital ledger. It also copies and distributes the database to a network of computers to validate each transaction. This decentralizes, secures, and publicizes each digital currency’s or property’s database of transactions.
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Blockchain is a decentralized digital ledger (a continuously growing list of electronic records) of transactions kept over time and secured using cryptography (a kind of algorithmic code). Blockchain ledger data is distributed across a network of computers. Its users can directly interact with stored data in real-time without the need for an intermediary (a “middle-man” or distributor) to authenticate transactions. The technology provides an independent, tamper-resistant, and transparent platform for parties within the blockchain to securely store, transmit, and process sensitive information.

Alice wants to use her Bitcoin to buy pizza from Bob. She’d send him her private “key,” a private sequence of letters and numbers, which contains her source transaction of the coins, amount, and Bob’s digital wallet address. That “address” would be another, this time, the public sequence of letters and numbers. Bob scans the “key” with his smartphone to decode it. At the same time, Alice’s transaction is broadcast to all the other network participants (called “nodes”) on her ledger, and, approximately, ten minutes later, is confirmed, through a process of certain technical and business rules called “mining.” This “mining” process gives Bob a score to know whether or not to proceed with Alice’s transaction.

If the private key is lost, the bitcoin network will not recognize any other evidence of ownership;[31] the coins are then unusable, and effectively lost. For example, in 2013 one user claimed to have lost 7,500 bitcoins, worth $7.5 million at the time, when he accidentally discarded a hard drive containing his private key.[76] A backup of his key(s) would have prevented this.


You also have private blockchains. These are often used for more niche purposes like a business managing data or interacting with its customers. For example, Northern Trust, the financial services firm created one with IBM that it’s been testing for more than a year to store data such as biometric information and other records. In June, it also won a patent for storing meeting notes on the blockchain.
Projects involving smart contracts for devices have been predicted to become very common. The world's leading IT research company, Gartner, has made the prediction that by the time we reach 2020 at least 20 bln connected devices will exist. These devices are using Ethereum smart contracts. For instance, we have the Ethereum lightbulb, we have the Ethereum BlockCharge, involving the charging of electric vehicles, and lastly CryptoSeal; this is a tamper-proof seal for drug safety.
In 2014, prices started at $770 and fell to $314 for the year.[32] In February 2014 the Mt. Gox exchange, the largest bitcoin exchange at the time, said that 850,000 bitcoins had been stolen from its customers, amounting to almost $500 million. Bitcoin's price fell by almost half, from $867 to $439 (a 49% drop). Prices remained low until late 2016.[citation needed]
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