As Bitcoin’s price hit the record $5,000 for the second time in 2017, there is probably no current investment opportunity more hyped up than cryptocurrencies and Blockchain technology. The general public and governing authorities are increasingly more aware of its advantages, and most concerns surrounding it are being refuted. A lot of companies have already invested in the technology, and it is very telling that the worldwide technology giant IBM is now considering investing “employee time and energy” into the space.
Up to this day, Bitcoin uninterruptedly works as money one person pays another person for goods and services. Once Bitcoin is exchanged, the record of the transaction is publicly recorded onto a ledger known as the blockchain, which other Bitcoin users, known as miners, verify by putting those transactions into a block and adding it to the blockchain after Proof of Work (PoW).
Derivatives are used in stock exchanges and are concerned with the values of assets. Smart contracts in the trading of stocks and shares could revolutionize current practices by streamlining, automating and reducing the costs of derivatives trading across the industry. Settlements could be completed in seconds rather than the three days that are needed at present. Using smart contracts, peer-to-peer trading will become a usual operation, resulting in a complete revolution in stock trading. Barclays and several other companies has already trialed a way of trading derivatives using smart contracts, but they came to the conclusion that the technology won’t work unless banks collaborate to implement it.
Blockchain technology helps counter issues like double spending.  The simplest way to think of blockchain is as a large distributed ledger of sorts that stores records of transactions. This “ledger” is replicated hundreds of times throughout the public network so it is available to everyone. Every time a transaction occurs, it is updated in ALL of these replicated ledgers, so everyone can see it.

Blockchain technology uses an algorithm to assign a cryptographic hash (a unique string of letters and numbers—also sometimes called the “digital fingerprint”) to each block. In addition to the hash, each block contains timestamped sets of prior transactions, plus the hash of the previous block—which is what creates the immutable link between sequential blocks in the chain.
This is going to come off rude but may I suggest you perform some basic proof-reading of your article prior to publication to fix all the grammatical errors (of which there are many) if you wish to teach your audience something new without insulting their intelligence by forcing them to fix your ill-structured sentences to clarify your own writing.
You want to make sure people with bitcoin accounts can find you and spend their bitcoins on your site. You can apply to a variety of online directories designed for bitcoin users. Simply follow the application instructions on the directory websites. You can also download and display the bitcoin logo on your website to signal to users that you accept bitcoins as payment.[20]

Transparency: even though personal information on blockchain is kept private, the technology itself is almost always open source. That means that users on the blockchain network can modify the code as they see fit, so long as they have a majority of the network’s computational power backing them. Keeping data on the blockchain open source also makes tampering with data that much more difficult. With millions of computers on the blockchain network at any given time, for example, it is unlikely that anyone could make a change without being noticed.
News drives attention, and attention drives understanding. While many people have flocked to cryptocurrencies purely in search of financial gain, there are a ton of people that are simply curious. Some peoples are sticking around and trying to understand what cryptos are all about. While more users increase Bitcoin’s network effect, more people forming in-depth understandings of cryptos also strengthen the active Bitcoin community.
Instead of using an order book, OTC desks connect buy and sell orders directly between people. Desks are most commonly used for buying or selling incredibly large quantities of bitcoin, often surpassing millions of dollars in value. Some OTC desks even require a minimum trade value. Often, they are used specifically because a purchase or sale of such a large quantity need not affect the order books of exchanges. If a large order were to be filled on an exchange’s order book, it would significantly move the price of bitcoin. This is sometimes unfavorable for someone looking to buy or sell bitcoins without shifting the market price or without drawing attention to the transaction (OTC desks are not required to publicly disclose purchases).
The receiver of the first bitcoin transaction was cypherpunk Hal Finney, who created the first reusable proof-of-work system (RPOW) in 2004.[22] Finney downloaded the bitcoin software on its release date, and on 12 January 2009 received ten bitcoins from Nakamoto.[23][24] Other early cypherpunk supporters were creators of bitcoin predecessors: Wei Dai, creator of b-money, and Nick Szabo, creator of bit gold.[25] In 2010, the first known commercial transaction using bitcoin occurred when programmer Laszlo Hanyecz bought two Papa John's pizzas for 10,000 bitcoin.[26]
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