Readers may remember CCN’s coverage of PaidBooks.com, a site run by the friendly folks behind Bitcoin Aliens. It has the same functionality as a regular faucet, but instead pays users for reading classic books. It is one of the more interesting and engaging methods of giving away free money, as it gives the user the opportunity to engage in more ways than simply getting around a CAPTCHA and pressing a couple of buttons. Since we first wrote about PaidBooks, they seem to have converted to Bitcoin Cash via a service called AirDrips. BCH is easily converted to Bitcoin, if desired, via services like ShapeShift. You create an accout at AirDrips and then you are able to read books and get paid. They also offer other similar things such as watching videos for money.
However, that being said, cryptocurrencies are unique in that clever marketers can make a profit doing exactly that, giving away money. This would not be possible in other currencies, where they simply can’t be broken down small enough. The operator will usually make less than a penny. If they were forced to give you a penny or more, there’d be no way to be profitable.
The main reason we even have this cryptocurrency and blockchain revolution is as a result of the perceived shortcomings of the traditional banking system. What shortcomings, you ask? For example, when transferring money to overseas markets, a payment could be delayed for days while a bank verifies it. Many would argue that financial institutions shouldn't tie up cross-border payments and funds for such an extensive amount of time.
Such an attack is extremely difficult to execute for a blockchain of Bitcoin’s scale, as it would require an attacker to gain control of millions of computers. When Bitcoin was first founded in 2009 and its users numbered in the dozens, it would have been easier for an attacker to control a majority of computational power in the network. This defining characteristic of blockchain has been flagged as one weakness for fledgling cryptocurrencies.
People, don’t be fooled by the apparent advantages and usages of Blockchain technology or Bitcoin, it’s what you don’t know that is destructive to you personally and to society in general. It is merely another way to control you through information, to hack into your private lives and the only ones that truly benefit from this technology are the global wealthy elite, the greedy, materialistic oligarchs of global chaos and conflict. Bitcoin is virtual money, it doesn’t really exist except on the computer!
The potential for added efficiency in share settlement makes a strong use case for blockchains in stock trading. When executed peer-to-peer, trade confirmations become almost instantaneous (as opposed to taking three days for clearance). Potentially, this means intermediaries — such as the clearing house, auditors and custodians — get removed from the process.
Though each bitcoin transaction is recorded in a public log, names of buyers and sellers are never revealed – only their wallet IDs. While that keeps bitcoin users’ transactions private, it also lets them buy or sell anything without easily tracing it back to them. That’s why it has become the currency of choice for people online buying drugs or other illicit activities.
Transactions on the blockchain network are approved by a network of thousands or millions of computers. This removes almost all human involvement in the verification process, resulting in less human error and a more accurate record of information. Even if a computer on the network were to make a computational mistake, the error would only be made to one copy of the blockchain. In order for that error to spread to the rest of the blockchain, it would need to be made by at least 51% of the network’s computers — a near impossibility.
Bitcoin is a new currency that was created in 2009 by an unknown person using the alias Satoshi Nakamoto. Transactions are made with no middle men – meaning, no banks! Bitcoin can be used to book hotels on Expedia, shop for furniture on Overstock and buy Xbox games. But much of the hype is about getting rich by trading it. The price of bitcoin skyrocketed into the thousands in 2017.
Typically, consumers pay a bank to verify a transaction, a notary to sign a document, or a minister to perform a marriage. Blockchain eliminates the need for third-party verification and, with it, their associated costs. Business owners incur a small fee whenever they accept payments using credit cards, for example, because banks have to process those transactions. Bitcoin, on the other hand, does not have a central authority and has virtually no transaction fees.
Say John buys a lemonade from Sandy’s lemonade stand. On John’s copy of the blockchain, he marks that transaction down: “John bought Lemonade from Sandy, $2.” His copy gets spread around town to all the lemonade stands and lemonade buyers, who add this transaction to their own copies. By the time John has finished drinking that lemonade, everyone’s blockchain ledger shows that he bought his lemonade from Sandy for $2.
Remember that "Bitcoin exchange" and "Bitcoin wallet" need not be the same. Bitcoin exchanges are kind of like foreign exchange markets – places where you can trade Bitcoin for a fiat currency, say, BTC for USD and vice versa (in U.S. for example). While exchanges offer wallet capabilities to users, it’s not their primary business. Since wallets need to be kept safe and secure, exchanges do not encourage storing of Bitcoins for higher amounts or long periods of time. Hence, it is best to transfer your Bitcoins to a secure wallet. Security must be your top priority while opting for a Bitcoin wallet; always opt for the one with multi-signature facility.
Bitcoin faucets have been around since at least 2011. It is believed that Gavin Andresen owned the first one. They come and go and often enough are just advertising scams – the owners want users on their site so they tempt them with free Bitcoin that never actually materializes because before the users have made enough to “cash out” the site has disappeared.

Instead of using an order book, OTC desks connect buy and sell orders directly between people. Desks are most commonly used for buying or selling incredibly large quantities of bitcoin, often surpassing millions of dollars in value. Some OTC desks even require a minimum trade value. Often, they are used specifically because a purchase or sale of such a large quantity need not affect the order books of exchanges. If a large order were to be filled on an exchange’s order book, it would significantly move the price of bitcoin. This is sometimes unfavorable for someone looking to buy or sell bitcoins without shifting the market price or without drawing attention to the transaction (OTC desks are not required to publicly disclose purchases).

Inter Planetary File System (IPFS) makes it easy to conceptualize how a distributed web might operate. Similar to the way a BitTorrent moves data around the internet, IPFS gets rid of the need for centralized client-server relationships (i.e., the current web). An internet made up of completely decentralized websites has the potential to speed up file transfer and streaming times. Such an improvement is not only convenient. It’s a necessary upgrade to the web’s currently overloaded content-delivery systems.
In 2014, prices started at $770 and fell to $314 for the year.[32] In February 2014 the Mt. Gox exchange, the largest bitcoin exchange at the time, said that 850,000 bitcoins had been stolen from its customers, amounting to almost $500 million. Bitcoin's price fell by almost half, from $867 to $439 (a 49% drop). Prices remained low until late 2016.[citation needed]
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