1.) Irreversible: After confirmation, a transaction can‘t be reversed. By nobody. And nobody means nobody. Not you, not your bank, not the president of the United States, not Satoshi, not your miner. Nobody. If you send money, you send it. Period. No one can help you, if you sent your funds to a scammer or if a hacker stole them from your computer. There is no safety net.
At its simplest, Bitcoin is either virtual currency or reference to the technology. You can make transactions by check, wiring, or cash. You can also use Bitcoin (or BTC), where you refer the purchaser to your signature, which is a long line of security code encrypted with 16 distinct symbols. The purchaser decodes the code with his smartphone to get your cryptocurrency. Put another way; cryptocurrency is an exchange of digital information that allows you to buy or sell goods and services.The transaction gains its security and trust by running on a peer-to-peer computer network that is similar to Skype, or BitTorrent, a file-sharing system.

Nobody owns the Bitcoin network much like no one owns the technology behind email or the Internet. Bitcoin transactions are verified by Bitcoin miners which has an entire industry and Bitcoin cloud mining options. While developers are improving the software they cannot force a change in the Bitcoin protocol because all users are free to choose what software and version they use.


1.) Irreversible: After confirmation, a transaction can‘t be reversed. By nobody. And nobody means nobody. Not you, not your bank, not the president of the United States, not Satoshi, not your miner. Nobody. If you send money, you send it. Period. No one can help you, if you sent your funds to a scammer or if a hacker stole them from your computer. There is no safety net.
With companies like Uber and Airbnb flourishing, the sharing economy is already a proven success. Currently, however, users who want to hail a ride-sharing service have to rely on an intermediary like Uber. By enabling peer-to-peer payments, the blockchain opens the door to direct interaction between parties — a truly decentralized sharing economy results.
Proof of Work is a system that requires some work from the service requester, usually meaning processing time by a computer. Producing a proof of work is a random process with low probability, so normally a lot of trial and error is required for a valid proof of work to be generated. When it comes to Bitcoins, hash is what serves as a proof of work.
The private key (comparable to an ATM PIN) is meant to be a guarded secret, and only used to authorize Bitcoin transmissions. Thus, it’s the “private key” that is kept in a Bitcoin wallet. Some safeguards for a Bitcoin wallet include: encrypting the wallet with a strong password and choosing the cold storage option, i.e. storing it offline. In the case of Coinbase, they offer a secure "multisig vault" to host your keys, which you can sign up for. 
2. That transaction must be verified. After making that purchase, your transaction must be verified. With other public records of information, like the Securities Exchange Commission, Wikipedia, or your local library, there’s someone in charge of vetting new data entries. With blockchain, however, that job is left up to a network of computers. These networks often consist of thousands (or in the case of Bitcoin, about 5 million) computers spread across the globe. When you make your purchase from Amazon, that network of computers rushes to check that your transaction happened in the way you said it did. That is, they confirm the details of the purchase, including the transaction’s time, dollar amount, and participants. (More on how this happens in a second.)
Nobody owns the Bitcoin network much like no one owns the technology behind email or the Internet. Bitcoin transactions are verified by Bitcoin miners which has an entire industry and Bitcoin cloud mining options. While developers are improving the software they cannot force a change in the Bitcoin protocol because all users are free to choose what software and version they use.
Blockchain technology accounts for the issues of security and trust in several ways. First, new blocks are always stored linearly and chronologically. That is, they are always added to the “end” of the blockchain. If you take a look at Bitcoin’s blockchain, you’ll see that each block has a position on the chain, called a “height.” As of February 2019, the block’s height had topped 562,000.
Now, if there is no central system, how would everyone in the system get to know that a certain transaction has happened? The network follows the gossip protocol. Think of how gossip spreads. Suppose Alice sent 3 ETH to Bob. The nodes nearest to her will get to know of this, and then they will tell the nodes closest to them, and then they will tell their neighbors, and this will keep on spreading out until everyone knows. Nodes are basically your nosy, annoying relatives.

Full clients verify transactions directly by downloading a full copy of the blockchain (over 150 GB As of January 2018).[94] They are the most secure and reliable way of using the network, as trust in external parties is not required. Full clients check the validity of mined blocks, preventing them from transacting on a chain that breaks or alters network rules.[95] Because of its size and complexity, downloading and verifying the entire blockchain is not suitable for all computing devices.
Accept bitcoins as payment. A number of businesses and services now accept bitcoins as payment. If you do any online services, you can also accept bitcoins as payment. Accepting payment in bitcoins can be beneficial if you're a small business or independent professional (like a dentist), because it does not cost money to accept bitcoins as payment.[17] You can also avoid chargebacks, or consumer disputes with their credit card issuer that lose you money, because bitcoin transactions are irreversible.[18]
That one google doc’s guy is sort of off in his definition of blockchain to dita…as that is what that scenario is. I worked with a system named Centralpoint also allows for a IFTTT (If this then that) approach to building your own logic engine (or rules engine), which to use Blockchain venacular would be considered Smart Contracts. Examples of this would be when to send someone an email report (business intelligence) or when to trigger a new record entry into your CRM.
There is a definite need for better identity management on the web. The ability to verify your identity is the lynchpin of financial transactions that happen online. However, remedies for the security risks that come with web commerce are imperfect at best. Distributed ledgers offer enhanced methods for proving who you are, along with the possibility to digitize personal documents. Having a secure identity will also be important for online interactions — for instance, in the sharing economy. A good reputation, after all, is the most important condition for conducting transactions online.

Blockchain technology helps counter issues like double spending.  The simplest way to think of blockchain is as a large distributed ledger of sorts that stores records of transactions. This “ledger” is replicated hundreds of times throughout the public network so it is available to everyone. Every time a transaction occurs, it is updated in ALL of these replicated ledgers, so everyone can see it.
According to him, as we go through our lives, we leave this trail of digital data crumbs behind us. These are then collected and created into a digital profile of us – which is not owned by us! If we were to reclaim our “virtual” data, and take control over how much and who we give it out to, wouldn’t that be a great step towards helping us protect our privacy?
The bitcoin blockchain is a public ledger that records bitcoin transactions.[67] It is implemented as a chain of blocks, each block containing a hash of the previous block up to the genesis block[a] of the chain. A network of communicating nodes running bitcoin software maintains the blockchain.[31]:215–219 Transactions of the form payer X sends Y bitcoins to payee Z are broadcast to this network using readily available software applications.
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