Whether it’s Bitcoin transactions or data about how a shipment of flowers is making its way from Senegal to the Netherlands, the block is the mechanism that records information to the blockchain. Some people like to compare it to an Excel spread sheet or a Google Doc. Those blocks come together to make up the blockchain, which is the overall digital record of transactions. Every time one is completed, the next can be created. So far, this has been a lot slower than some parts of the internet, partly because certain blockchains need to have every party agree before it’s added in order to help make it transparent and secure. That makes the chain the overall list, a record of all transactions.

The reward is not the the only incentive for miners to keep running their hardware. They also get the transaction fees that Bitcoin users pay. Currently, as there is a huge amount of transactions happening within the Bitcoin network, the transaction fees have skyrocketed. Even though the fees are voluntary on the part of the sender, miners will always prioritize transfers with higher transaction fees. So, unless you are willing to pay a rather high fee, your transaction might take a very long time to be processed.
The receiver of the first bitcoin transaction was cypherpunk Hal Finney, who created the first reusable proof-of-work system (RPOW) in 2004.[22] Finney downloaded the bitcoin software on its release date, and on 12 January 2009 received ten bitcoins from Nakamoto.[23][24] Other early cypherpunk supporters were creators of bitcoin predecessors: Wei Dai, creator of b-money, and Nick Szabo, creator of bit gold.[25] In 2010, the first known commercial transaction using bitcoin occurred when programmer Laszlo Hanyecz bought two Papa John's pizzas for 10,000 bitcoin.[26]
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