With smart contracts, a certain set of criteria for specific insurance-related situations can be established. In theory, with the implementation of Blockchain technology, you could just submit your insurance claim online and receive an instant automatic payout. Providing, of course, that your claim meets all the required criteria. French insurance giant AXA is the first major insurance group to offer insurance using Blockchain technology. They’ve recently introduced a new flight-delay insurance product that will use smart contracts to store and process payouts. Other insurance companies will surely follow suit.
Several news outlets have asserted that the popularity of bitcoins hinges on the ability to use them to purchase illegal goods.[129][221] Nobel-prize winning economist Joseph Stiglitz says that bitcoin's anonymity encourages money laundering and other crimes, "If you open up a hole like bitcoin, then all the nefarious activity will go through that hole, and no government can allow that." He's also said that if "you regulate it so you couldn't engage in money laundering and all these other [crimes], there will be no demand for Bitcoin. By regulating the abuses, you are going to regulate it out of existence. It exists because of the abuses."[222][223]
Each computer in the blockchain network has its own copy of the blockchain, which means that there are thousands, or in the case of Bitcoin, millions of copies of the same blockchain. Although each copy of the blockchain is identical, spreading that information across a network of computers makes the information more difficult to manipulate. With blockchain, there isn’t a single, definitive account of events that can be manipulated. Instead, a hacker would need to manipulate every copy of the blockchain on the network.

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It seems as if overnight, the media industry has gotten the blockchain bug. Today, there are events, panels, articles and conversations about how blockchain will save journalism and advertising and marketing. In fact, Adweek has one of its very own. But before we decide whether or not this technology will be media’s savior, we wanted to answer some pretty basic questions. We’re also introducing a weekly blockchain newsletter, which you can sign up for here.
Bob spread his spreadsheet diary over 5,000 computers, which were  all over the world. These computers are called nodes. Every time a transaction occurs it has to be approved by the nodes, each of whom checks its validity. Once every node has checked a transaction there is a sort of electronic vote, as some nodes may think the transaction is valid and others think it is a fraud.
Lightweight clients consult full clients to send and receive transactions without requiring a local copy of the entire blockchain (see simplified payment verification – SPV). This makes lightweight clients much faster to set up and allows them to be used on low-power, low-bandwidth devices such as smartphones. When using a lightweight wallet, however, the user must trust the server to a certain degree, as it can report faulty values back to the user. Lightweight clients follow the longest blockchain and do not ensure it is valid, requiring trust in miners.[96]
If you prefer to keep your bitcoins on your own computer, a desktop wallet is the wallet for you. A desktop wallet downloads and stores the entire blockchain. That means the wallet will have the entire ledger with every bitcoin transaction ever made. The size of the bitcoin blockchain is 30 gigabyte and growing, so keep that in mind, before going with a desktop wallet solution. The blockchain will take some time, maybe days to download, so you will not be able to deposit and withdraw bitcoins from the wallet until the whole blockchain has been downloaded. Also, everytime you start the wallet it needs to download all the latest transactions in the blockchain. You also need to make sure the wallet is backed up. Otherwise you will loose all your coins if your hard drive fails.

Computing power is often bundled together or "pooled" to reduce variance in miner income. Individual mining rigs often have to wait for long periods to confirm a block of transactions and receive payment. In a pool, all participating miners get paid every time a participating server solves a block. This payment depends on the amount of work an individual miner contributed to help find that block.[86]
In a traditional environment, trusted third parties act as intermediaries for financial transactions. If you have ever sent money overseas, it will pass through an intermediary (usually a bank). It will usually not be instantaneous (taking up to 3 days) and the intermediary will take a commission for doing this either in the form of exchange rate conversion or other charges.

Volatility. This very reason many speculators are attracted to Bitcoin is the same reason many potential users are hesitant to get involved. Users that look at Bitcoin as a speculative investment option are essentially gambling on the process, and the future price of Bitcoin is largely unknown. There are estimates that Bitcoin will both be worth pennies in a few years, while some predict that a single bitcoin will be worth $500k in three years. As new investors continue to invest and the market cap grows, Bitcoin’s price could become more stable.

It seems as if overnight, the media industry has gotten the blockchain bug. Today, there are events, panels, articles and conversations about how blockchain will save journalism and advertising and marketing. In fact, Adweek has one of its very own. But before we decide whether or not this technology will be media’s savior, we wanted to answer some pretty basic questions. We’re also introducing a weekly blockchain newsletter, which you can sign up for here.
A prospective miner needs a bitcoin wallet—an encrypted online bank account—to hold what is earned. The problem is, as in most bitcoin scenarios, wallets are unregulated and prone to attacks. Late last year, hackers staged a bitcoin heist in which they stole some $1.2 million worth of the currency from the site Inputs.io. When bitcoins are lost or stolen they are completely gone, just like cash. With no central bank backing your bitcoins, there is no possible way to recoup your loses.
Blockchain will play a major role in the roll out of IoT, but will also provide ways of guarding against hackers. Because it is built for decentralized control, a security scheme based on it should be scalable enough to cover the rapid growth of the IoT. Moreover, Blockchain’s strong protection against data tampering will help prevent a rogue device from disrupting a home, factory or transportation system by relaying misleading information.

In September 2015, the establishment of the peer-reviewed academic journal Ledger (ISSN 2379-5980) was announced. It covers studies of cryptocurrencies and related technologies, and is published by the University of Pittsburgh.[231] The journal encourages authors to digitally sign a file hash of submitted papers, which will then be timestamped into the bitcoin blockchain. Authors are also asked to include a personal bitcoin address in the first page of their papers.[232][233]
Bloomberg reported that the largest 17 crypto merchant-processing services handled $69 million in June 2018, down from $411 million in September 2017. Bitcoin is "not actually usable" for retail transactions because of high costs and the inability to process chargebacks, according to Nicholas Weaver, a researcher quoted by Bloomberg. High price volatility and transaction fees make paying for small retail purchases with bitcoin impractical, according to economist Kim Grauer. However, bitcoin continues to be used for large-item purchases on sites such as Overstock.com, and for cross-border payments to freelancers and other vendors.[136]
People need to understand that “blockchain” is NOT the same thing as “bitcoin”. Bitcoin was the first blockchain system designed, but there have been a number of others since then which are very different – they were designed by different people, often for different purposes. The ones moving into the business world today are NOT systems for electronic money. They are “ledger” systems that are used to replace existing methods, almost none of which are electronic money. Examples of such blockchain systems are Hyperledger (which has several different schemes, the most popular being Hyperledger Fabric), Ethereum, R3 Corda, and some others. They were NOT designed by “some guy” somewhere – they were designed by highly capable groups of people who are in the business of designing things for use by corporations to operate their businesses. Several of these are in open-source projects, where they are being developed jointly by many people, and are subject to study and analysis by all of them. There is work in early stages to define regional and international standards that will define some requirements for the blockchains. (I happen to be involved with some of those standards activities, as well as development on one of the blockchain systems.)
2. That transaction must be verified. After making that purchase, your transaction must be verified. With other public records of information, like the Securities Exchange Commission, Wikipedia, or your local library, there’s someone in charge of vetting new data entries. With blockchain, however, that job is left up to a network of computers. These networks often consist of thousands (or in the case of Bitcoin, about 5 million) computers spread across the globe. When you make your purchase from Amazon, that network of computers rushes to check that your transaction happened in the way you said it did. That is, they confirm the details of the purchase, including the transaction’s time, dollar amount, and participants. (More on how this happens in a second.)
Network nodes can validate transactions, add them to their copy of the ledger, and then broadcast these ledger additions to other nodes. To achieve independent verification of the chain of ownership each network node stores its own copy of the blockchain.[68] About every 10 minutes, a new group of accepted transactions, called a block, is created, added to the blockchain, and quickly published to all nodes, without requiring central oversight. This allows bitcoin software to determine when a particular bitcoin was spent, which is needed to prevent double-spending. A conventional ledger records the transfers of actual bills or promissory notes that exist apart from it, but the blockchain is the only place that bitcoins can be said to exist in the form of unspent outputs of transactions.[3]:ch. 5
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