People need to understand that “blockchain” is NOT the same thing as “bitcoin”. Bitcoin was the first blockchain system designed, but there have been a number of others since then which are very different – they were designed by different people, often for different purposes. The ones moving into the business world today are NOT systems for electronic money. They are “ledger” systems that are used to replace existing methods, almost none of which are electronic money. Examples of such blockchain systems are Hyperledger (which has several different schemes, the most popular being Hyperledger Fabric), Ethereum, R3 Corda, and some others. They were NOT designed by “some guy” somewhere – they were designed by highly capable groups of people who are in the business of designing things for use by corporations to operate their businesses. Several of these are in open-source projects, where they are being developed jointly by many people, and are subject to study and analysis by all of them. There is work in early stages to define regional and international standards that will define some requirements for the blockchains. (I happen to be involved with some of those standards activities, as well as development on one of the blockchain systems.)
On 24 August 2017 (at block 481,824), Segregated Witness (SegWit) went live. Transactions contain some data which is only used to verify the transaction, and does not otherwise effect the movement of coins. SegWit introduced a new transaction format that moved this data into a new field in a backwards-compatible way. The segregated data, the so-called witness, is not sent to non-SegWit nodes and therefore does not form part of the blockchain as seen by legacy nodes. This lowers the size of the average transaction in such nodes' view, thereby increasing the block size without incurring the hard fork implied by other proposals for block size increases. Thus, per computer scientist Jochen Hoenicke, the actual block capacity depends on the ratio of SegWit transactions in the block, and on the ratio of signature data. Based on his estimate, if the ratio of SegWit transactions is 50%, the block capacity may be 1.25 megabytes. According to Hoenicke, if native SegWit addresses from Bitcoin Core version 0.16.0 are used, and SegWit adoption reaches 90% to 95%, a block size of up to 1.8 megabytes is possible.[citation needed]

Up to this day, Bitcoin uninterruptedly works as money one person pays another person for goods and services. Once Bitcoin is exchanged, the record of the transaction is publicly recorded onto a ledger known as the blockchain, which other Bitcoin users, known as miners, verify by putting those transactions into a block and adding it to the blockchain after Proof of Work (PoW).
Peer to peer (P2P) electronic cash is simply described as online money sent from one person to another without the need for a trusted third-party. As described in the original Bitcoin whitepaper by Satoshi Nakamoto, P2P cash makes use of digital signatures as part of the solution, but the main benefits are lost if a trusted third party is still required to prevent fraud. This makes P2P cash a trustless and safe way to transact without the need of intermediaries.
The potential for added efficiency in share settlement makes a strong use case for blockchains in stock trading. When executed peer-to-peer, trade confirmations become almost instantaneous (as opposed to taking three days for clearance). Potentially, this means intermediaries — such as the clearing house, auditors and custodians — get removed from the process.

Bitfortip :: Earn Bitcoins by answering forum questions. This is a nice service because it brings people together who are interested in Bitcoin and many other topics. At the same time it allows to pay rewards in bitcoin for answering questions. This is something that would not have been possible without a currency like Bitcoin that has low transaction fees and instant transfers
Double spending means, as the name suggests, that a Bitcoin user is illicitly spending the same money twice. With physical currency, this isn't an issue: Once you hand someone a greenback $20 bill to buy a bottle of vodka, you no longer have it, so there's no danger you could use that same $20 to buy lotto tickets next door. With digital currency, however, as the Investopedia dictionary explains, "there is a risk that the holder could make a copy of the digital token and send it to a merchant or another party while retaining the original."

Block Chain based distributed ledger systems are definitely the next paradigm, driven mainly by the need to control ‘cyber crime’ and improve web ‘user experience’. However, the biggest problem in implementing a block chain systems is to devise the control mechanism for supervision. This could be achieved by a two-tier block chain system. Is anybody thinking on these lines?

Ponzi schemes.[28] Beware of anyone making promises that you can easily make incredibly high returns by getting in on the "ground floor" of a new phenomenon, especially if that person promises you little to no risk. You should also be on the lookout for any "investment opportunity" that does not have minimum investor qualifications, or that has complicated fee structures or strategies.[29]
The potential for added efficiency in share settlement makes a strong use case for blockchains in stock trading. When executed peer-to-peer, trade confirmations become almost instantaneous (as opposed to taking three days for clearance). Potentially, this means intermediaries — such as the clearing house, auditors and custodians — get removed from the process.
Small wonder that Bitcoin emerged in 2008 just after Occupy Wall Street accused big banks of misusing borrowers’ money, duping clients, rigging the system, and charging boggling fees. Bitcoin pioneers wanted to put the seller in charge, eliminate the middleman, cancel interest fees, and make transactions transparent, to hack corruption and cut fees. They created a decentralized system, where you could control your funds and know what was going on.
The reward is agreed-upon by everyone in the network but is generally 12.5 bitcoins as well as the fees paid by users sending transactions. To prevent inflation and to keep the system manageable, there can be no more than a fixed total number of 21 million bitcoins (or BTCs) in circulation by the year 2040, so the “puzzle” gets increasingly harder to solve.
News drives attention, and attention drives understanding. While many people have flocked to cryptocurrencies purely in search of financial gain, there are a ton of people that are simply curious. Some peoples are sticking around and trying to understand what cryptos are all about. While more users increase Bitcoin’s network effect, more people forming in-depth understandings of cryptos also strengthen the active Bitcoin community.

In the proof of work system, computers must “prove” that they have done “work” by solving a complex computational math problem. If a computer solves one of these problems, they become eligible to add a block to the blockchain. But the process of adding blocks to the blockchain, what the cryptocurrency world calls “mining,” is not easy. In fact, according to the blockchain news site BlockExplorer, the odds of solving one of these problems on the Bitcoin network were about 1 in 5.8 trillion in February 2019. To solve complex math problems at those odds, computers must run programs that cost them significant amounts of power and energy (read: money).
Nakamoto is estimated to have mined one million bitcoins[27] before disappearing in 2010, when he handed the network alert key and control of the code repository over to Gavin Andresen. Andresen later became lead developer at the Bitcoin Foundation.[28][29] Andresen then sought to decentralize control. This left opportunity for controversy to develop over the future development path of bitcoin.[30][29]
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