Say John buys a lemonade from Sandy’s lemonade stand. On John’s copy of the blockchain, he marks that transaction down: “John bought Lemonade from Sandy, $2.” His copy gets spread around town to all the lemonade stands and lemonade buyers, who add this transaction to their own copies. By the time John has finished drinking that lemonade, everyone’s blockchain ledger shows that he bought his lemonade from Sandy for $2.
Here’s a thought, the uses and advantages of blockchain technology can be used to create a real life country. Be a cyber revolutionary if you will. The events in Spain and Catalonia offers a very rare and perishable opportunity for the blockchain community to help the people of Catalonia to have a peaceful revolution. I am new to this but i can see that you could create a real life country function on blockchain technology. The advantages of blockchain tech can be used by the people of Catalonia to secede from Spain where it matters most: information, finance and governance. Blockchain proponents should descend on Catalonia and help them adopt their own blockchain based currency, dump the euro, and be the center of the blockchain universe. With this, significant impact can be had on the European economy enough for the whole of Europe and the world to take heed instead of just making political noise. The people of Catalonia should put their money where their mouth is. They should adopt a decentralized blockchain based currency and gain instant global recognition. Political recognition as an independent state can and is usually had through revolution, mostly the violent sort. But if the independent state of Catalonia will take control of its economy first by adopting blockchain currency, its economic standing in the world, albeit miniscule in terms of dollars and cents, will be cemented. This is especially when the whole world is looking at blockchain tech and its real-life applications. Political recognition will follow economic recognition. Look at Hongkong.
A wallet stores the information necessary to transact bitcoins. While wallets are often described as a place to hold[91] or store bitcoins,[92] due to the nature of the system, bitcoins are inseparable from the blockchain transaction ledger. A better way to describe a wallet is something that "stores the digital credentials for your bitcoin holdings"[92] and allows one to access (and spend) them. Bitcoin uses public-key cryptography, in which two cryptographic keys, one public and one private, are generated.[93] At its most basic, a wallet is a collection of these keys.
As I mentioned earlier, Bitcoin is not like a typical currency that you keep in your bank. You are responsible for the security of your Bitcoins and that’s why you keep it in a wallet that you have 100% control over. This is done by having the ownership of seed word or private key.  For the first timer, it may sound very technical, but it is actually easy to understand and learn.
^ Jump up to: a b "Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are useless". The Economist. 30 August 2018. Retrieved 4 September 2018. Lack of adoption and loads of volatility mean that cryptocurrencies satisfy none of those criteria. That does not mean they are going to go away (though scrutiny from regulators concerned about the fraud and sharp practice that is rife in the industry may dampen excitement in future). But as things stand there is little reason to think that cryptocurrencies will remain more than an overcomplicated, untrustworthy casino.
Transactions are defined using a Forth-like scripting language.[3]:ch. 5 Transactions consist of one or more inputs and one or more outputs. When a user sends bitcoins, the user designates each address and the amount of bitcoin being sent to that address in an output. To prevent double spending, each input must refer to a previous unspent output in the blockchain.[69] The use of multiple inputs corresponds to the use of multiple coins in a cash transaction. Since transactions can have multiple outputs, users can send bitcoins to multiple recipients in one transaction. As in a cash transaction, the sum of inputs (coins used to pay) can exceed the intended sum of payments. In such a case, an additional output is used, returning the change back to the payer.[69] Any input satoshis not accounted for in the transaction outputs become the transaction fee.[69]
So, what does blockchain technology bring to the table that current payment networks don't? For starters, and as noted, it's decentralized. That's a fancy way of saying that there's no central hub where transaction data is stored. Instead, servers and hard drives all over the world hold bits and pieces of these blocks of data. This is done for two purposes. First, it ensures that no one party can gain control over a cryptocurrency and blockchain. Also, it keeps cybercriminals from being able to hold a digital currency "hostage" should they gain access to transaction data.

The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission has issued four "Customer Advisories" for bitcoin and related investments.[14] A July 2018 warning emphasized that trading in any cryptocurrency is often speculative, and there is a risk of theft from hacking, and fraud.[165] A February 2018 advisory warned against investing into "IRS approved" virtual currency individual retirement accounts.[166] A December 2017 advisory warned that virtual currencies are risky because:
Although transactions are publicly recorded on the blockchain, user data is not — or, at least not in full. In order to conduct transactions on the Bitcoin network, participants must run a program called a “wallet.” Each wallet consists of two unique and distinct cryptographic keys: a public key and a private key. The public key is the location where transactions are deposited to and withdrawn from. This is also the key that appears on the blockchain ledger as the user’s digital signature.
On 1 August 2017, a hard fork of bitcoin was created, known as Bitcoin Cash.[107] Bitcoin Cash has a larger block size limit and had an identical blockchain at the time of fork. On 24 October 2017 another hard fork, Bitcoin Gold, was created. Bitcoin Gold changes the proof-of-work algorithm used in mining, as the developers felt that mining had become too specialized.[108]
Public blockchain networks tend to have pretty high standards for security, while private networks might be a little more trusting. But either way, the rules that form the consensus mechanism are what gives blockchain technology its flexibility and power. Anyone, individually, can check the validity of each transaction and come to a conclusion on whether it’s good or not.

Nakamoto is believed to have created the first blockchain database and has been the first to solve the double spending problem other digital currency failed to. While Bitcoin’s creator is shrouded in mystery, his Wizard of Oz status hasn’t stopped the digital currency from becoming increasingly popular with individuals, businesses, and even governments.

In the blockchain, bitcoins are registered to bitcoin addresses. Creating a bitcoin address requires nothing more than picking a random valid private key and computing the corresponding bitcoin address. This computation can be done in a split second. But the reverse, computing the private key of a given bitcoin address, is mathematically unfeasible. Users can tell others or make public a bitcoin address without compromising its corresponding private key. Moreover, the number of valid private keys is so vast that it is extremely unlikely someone will compute a key-pair that is already in use and has funds. The vast number of valid private keys makes it unfeasible that brute force could be used to compromise a private key. To be able to spend their bitcoins, the owner must know the corresponding private key and digitally sign the transaction. The network verifies the signature using the public key.[3]:ch. 5
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