You also have private blockchains. These are often used for more niche purposes like a business managing data or interacting with its customers. For example, Northern Trust, the financial services firm created one with IBM that it’s been testing for more than a year to store data such as biometric information and other records. In June, it also won a patent for storing meeting notes on the blockchain.

Bloomberg reported that the largest 17 crypto merchant-processing services handled $69 million in June 2018, down from $411 million in September 2017. Bitcoin is "not actually usable" for retail transactions because of high costs and the inability to process chargebacks, according to Nicholas Weaver, a researcher quoted by Bloomberg. High price volatility and transaction fees make paying for small retail purchases with bitcoin impractical, according to economist Kim Grauer. However, bitcoin continues to be used for large-item purchases on sites such as Overstock.com, and for cross-border payments to freelancers and other vendors.[136]

Governmental Services: National identity management systems, taxes/internal revenue monitoring, voting, and land management are just a few examples in which a blockchain ecosystem could be leveraged by public authorities. The State of Illinois, for example, recently launched a birth registry and identification system trial.6 The African nation of Ghana has also enabled land registration based on blockchain technology.7
Nakamoto is estimated to have mined one million bitcoins[27] before disappearing in 2010, when he handed the network alert key and control of the code repository over to Gavin Andresen. Andresen later became lead developer at the Bitcoin Foundation.[28][29] Andresen then sought to decentralize control. This left opportunity for controversy to develop over the future development path of bitcoin.[30][29]
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