Hey Ameer, do you happen to know a resource to read and gain a better understanding about the current and/or projected domestic legislative roadblocks blockchain technology companies have / will have (ie, specific regulation laws, patenting, etc.)? I’ve been read the cbinsights main read and the http://bit.ly/2oWFNyf market overview, felt they were excellent overviews. However, if anyone has specifics into the legislation, I would greatly appreciate filling in the last gaps.
In March 2013 the blockchain temporarily split into two independent chains with different rules. The two blockchains operated simultaneously for six hours, each with its own version of the transaction history. Normal operation was restored when the majority of the network downgraded to version 0.7 of the bitcoin software.[37] The Mt. Gox exchange briefly halted bitcoin deposits and the price dropped by 23% to $37[38][39] before recovering to previous level of approximately $48 in the following hours.[40] The US Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) established regulatory guidelines for "decentralized virtual currencies" such as bitcoin, classifying American bitcoin miners who sell their generated bitcoins as Money Service Businesses (MSBs), that are subject to registration or other legal obligations.[41][42][43] In April, exchanges BitInstant and Mt. Gox experienced processing delays due to insufficient capacity[44] resulting in the bitcoin price dropping from $266 to $76 before returning to $160 within six hours.[45] The bitcoin price rose to $259 on 10 April, but then crashed by 83% to $45 over the next three days.[35] On 15 May 2013, US authorities seized accounts associated with Mt. Gox after discovering it had not registered as a money transmitter with FinCEN in the US.[46][47] On 23 June 2013, the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) listed 11.02 bitcoins as a seized asset in a United States Department of Justice seizure notice pursuant to 21 U.S.C. § 881.[48] This marked the first time a government agency had seized bitcoin.[49][50] The FBI seized about 26,000 bitcoins in October 2013 from the dark web website Silk Road during the arrest of Ross William Ulbricht.[51][52][53] Bitcoin's price rose to $755 on 19 November and crashed by 50% to $378 the same day. On 30 November 2013 the price reached $1,163 before starting a long-term crash, declining by 87% to $152 in January 2015.[35] On 5 December 2013, the People's Bank of China prohibited Chinese financial institutions from using bitcoins.[54] After the announcement, the value of bitcoins dropped,[55] and Baidu no longer accepted bitcoins for certain services.[56] Buying real-world goods with any virtual currency had been illegal in China since at least 2009.[57]
Several thousand nodes make up the Bitcoin network. Once a majority of nodes reaches consensus that all transactions in the recent past are unique (that is, not double spent), they are cryptographically sealed into a block. Each new block is linked to previously sealed blocks to create a chain of accepted history, thereby preserving a verified record of every spend.
Transactions are defined using a Forth-like scripting language.[3]:ch. 5 Transactions consist of one or more inputs and one or more outputs. When a user sends bitcoins, the user designates each address and the amount of bitcoin being sent to that address in an output. To prevent double spending, each input must refer to a previous unspent output in the blockchain.[69] The use of multiple inputs corresponds to the use of multiple coins in a cash transaction. Since transactions can have multiple outputs, users can send bitcoins to multiple recipients in one transaction. As in a cash transaction, the sum of inputs (coins used to pay) can exceed the intended sum of payments. In such a case, an additional output is used, returning the change back to the payer.[69] Any input satoshis not accounted for in the transaction outputs become the transaction fee.[69]
Whether it’s Bitcoin transactions or data about how a shipment of flowers is making its way from Senegal to the Netherlands, the block is the mechanism that records information to the blockchain. Some people like to compare it to an Excel spread sheet or a Google Doc. Those blocks come together to make up the blockchain, which is the overall digital record of transactions. Every time one is completed, the next can be created. So far, this has been a lot slower than some parts of the internet, partly because certain blockchains need to have every party agree before it’s added in order to help make it transparent and secure. That makes the chain the overall list, a record of all transactions.
So, what does blockchain technology bring to the table that current payment networks don't? For starters, and as noted, it's decentralized. That's a fancy way of saying that there's no central hub where transaction data is stored. Instead, servers and hard drives all over the world hold bits and pieces of these blocks of data. This is done for two purposes. First, it ensures that no one party can gain control over a cryptocurrency and blockchain. Also, it keeps cybercriminals from being able to hold a digital currency "hostage" should they gain access to transaction data.

If you have been following banking, investing, or cryptocurrency over the last ten years, you may be familiar with “blockchain,” the record-keeping technology behind bitcoin. And there’s a good chance that it only makes so much sense. In trying to learn more about blockchain, you've probably encountered a definition like this: “blockchain is a distributed, decentralized, public ledger." The good news is, blockchain is actually easier to understand than that definition sounds.
This should be a big clue to you of the type of quasi-Christian eschatological mindset of the Oligarchs and the other powers that rule and control you! Never mind the governments to help you in your time of crisis, they haven’t really existed for a long time! Presidents and politician are decided upon before you even vote for them, as to who gets into office to supposedly “represent you”!

Blockchain technology accounts for the issues of security and trust in several ways. First, new blocks are always stored linearly and chronologically. That is, they are always added to the “end” of the blockchain. If you take a look at Bitcoin’s blockchain, you’ll see that each block has a position on the chain, called a “height.” As of February 2019, the block’s height had topped 562,000.
Skeptics like economist Nouriel Roubini have long argued excessive volatility, like monthly trading ranges greater than 100% observed in late 2017, would hinder mainstream adoption of digital assets. In an October Senate hearing on cryptocurrencies and blockchain, the professor of economics at New York University’s Stern School of Business spoke about volatility and other shortcomings.
Nakamoto is believed to have created the first blockchain database and has been the first to solve the double spending problem other digital currency failed to. While Bitcoin’s creator is shrouded in mystery, his Wizard of Oz status hasn’t stopped the digital currency from becoming increasingly popular with individuals, businesses, and even governments.
To lower the costs, bitcoin miners have set up in places like Iceland where geothermal energy is cheap and cooling Arctic air is free.[201] Bitcoin miners are known to use hydroelectric power in Tibet, Quebec, Washington (state), and Austria to reduce electricity costs.[200][202][203][204] Miners are attracted to suppliers such as Hydro Quebec that have energy surpluses.[205] According to a University of Cambridge study, much of bitcoin mining is done in China, where electricity is subsidized by the government.[206][207]

Block-chain technology is broader than finance. It can be applied to any multi-step transaction where traceability and visibility is required. Supply chain is a notable use case where Blockchain can be leveraged to manage and sign contracts and audit product provenance. It could also be leveraged for votation platforms, titles and deed management - amongst myriad other uses. As the digital and physical worlds converge, the practical applications of Blockchain will only grow.

Bitcoin is a new currency that was created in 2009 by an unknown person using the alias Satoshi Nakamoto. Transactions are made with no middle men – meaning, no banks! Bitcoin can be used to book hotels on Expedia, shop for furniture on Overstock and buy Xbox games. But much of the hype is about getting rich by trading it. The price of bitcoin skyrocketed into the thousands in 2017.
Plus, dealing with the IRS if you accept a lot of bitcoin in exchange for your goods and services might be more complicated than you want. Technically, the IRS sees bitcoin as a property, not a currency. This can get messy, since a bitcoin exchange can involve a gain or a loss in U.S. dollars, even if you’re gaining bitcoins. Talk to your accountant before diving into the world of bitcoin, and keep an eye out for future developments regarding bitcoin regulation.
In Person: Over-the-counter platforms such as CoinCola or LocalBitcoins are resources to find people in your area to trade bitcoins with. Trust and security can be a concern, which is why it's recommended you transact in a public place, and not necessarily with large amounts of cash. Some of those platforms, such as CoinCola, will allow its users to upload an ID proof. In this case, you will be able require the ID proof of your trade partner for added security.
Skeptics like economist Nouriel Roubini have long argued excessive volatility, like monthly trading ranges greater than 100% observed in late 2017, would hinder mainstream adoption of digital assets. In an October Senate hearing on cryptocurrencies and blockchain, the professor of economics at New York University’s Stern School of Business spoke about volatility and other shortcomings.
A smart contract is a computer code that can be built into blockchain to facilitate, verify, or negotiate a contract agreement. Smart contracts operate under a set of conditions that users agree to. When those conditions are met, the terms of the agreement are automatically carried out. Say, for example, I’m renting you my apartment using a smart contract. I agree to give you the door code to the apartment as soon as you pay me your security deposit. Both of us would send our portion of the deal to the smart contract, which would hold onto and automatically exchange my door code for your security deposit on the date of the rental. If I don’t supply the door code by the rental date, the smart contract refunds your security deposit. This eliminates the fees that typically accompany using a notary or third-party mediator.

Though each bitcoin transaction is recorded in a public log, names of buyers and sellers are never revealed – only their wallet IDs. While that keeps bitcoin users’ transactions private, it also lets them buy or sell anything without easily tracing it back to them. That’s why it has become the currency of choice for people online buying drugs or other illicit activities.
Whether you’re an individual buying a lemonade or a multinational lemonade company selling your beverages, each transaction you add to the blockchain is checked against everyone else’s blockchain ledgers. This system prevents anyone from using the same bitcoin more than once—which was the biggest problem with all-digital currencies before bitcoin came along.
Traditional online databases usually use a client-server network architecture. This means that users with access rights can change entries stored in the database, but the overall control remains with administrators. When it comes to a Blockchain database, each user is in charge of maintaining, calculating and updating every new entry. Every single node must work together to make sure that they are coming to the same conclusions.
Here’s a thought, the uses and advantages of blockchain technology can be used to create a real life country. Be a cyber revolutionary if you will. The events in Spain and Catalonia offers a very rare and perishable opportunity for the blockchain community to help the people of Catalonia to have a peaceful revolution. I am new to this but i can see that you could create a real life country function on blockchain technology. The advantages of blockchain tech can be used by the people of Catalonia to secede from Spain where it matters most: information, finance and governance. Blockchain proponents should descend on Catalonia and help them adopt their own blockchain based currency, dump the euro, and be the center of the blockchain universe. With this, significant impact can be had on the European economy enough for the whole of Europe and the world to take heed instead of just making political noise. The people of Catalonia should put their money where their mouth is. They should adopt a decentralized blockchain based currency and gain instant global recognition. Political recognition as an independent state can and is usually had through revolution, mostly the violent sort. But if the independent state of Catalonia will take control of its economy first by adopting blockchain currency, its economic standing in the world, albeit miniscule in terms of dollars and cents, will be cemented. This is especially when the whole world is looking at blockchain tech and its real-life applications. Political recognition will follow economic recognition. Look at Hongkong.
Platforms such as LocalBitcoins will help you to find individuals near you who are willing to exchange bitcoin for cash. Also, LibertyX lists retail outlets across the United States at which you can exchange cash for bitcoin. And WallofCoins, Paxful and BitQuick will direct you to a bank branch near you that will allow you to make a cash deposit and receive bitcoin a few hours later.
* In a supply chain auditing blockchain application (https://blockgeeks.com/guides/what-is-blockchain-technology/), it’s said “a Provenance pilot project ensures that fish sold in Sushi restaurants in Japan has been sustainably harvested by its suppliers in Indonesia”. I am wondering how this can be done. How can blockchain validate the origin of the fish? Or an ethical diamond? There is no reliable IDs on the fish or the diamonds.

Imagine the number of legal documents that should be used that way. Instead of passing them to each other, losing track of versions, and not being in sync with the other version, why can’t *all* business documents become shared instead of transferred back and forth? So many types of legal contracts would be ideal for that kind of workflow. You don’t need a blockchain to share documents, but the shared documents analogy is a powerful one.” – William Mougayar, Venture advisor, 4x entrepreneur, marketer, strategist and blockchain specialist


Some people would say that trading is a form of gambling. While there these two things have something in common, there are also fundamental differences. When you gamble (and assuming that it's a fair game) you have a certain probability of winning and losing. When you trade assets, this gets much more complex. I don't want to go into too much detail here. I just want to outline the concept how you can earn Bitcoins with trading.
Regarding more practical concerns, hacking and scams are the norms. They happen at least once a week and are getting more sophisticated. Bitcoin’s software complexity and the volatility of its currency dissuade many people from using it, while its transactions are frustratingly slow. You’ll have to wait at least ten minutes for your network to approve the transaction. Recently, some Reddit users reported waiting more than one hour for their transactions to be confirmed.
Researchers have pointed out at a "trend towards centralization". Although bitcoin can be sent directly from user to user, in practice intermediaries are widely used.[31]:220–222 Bitcoin miners join large mining pools to minimize the variance of their income.[31]:215, 219–222[111]:3[112] Because transactions on the network are confirmed by miners, decentralization of the network requires that no single miner or mining pool obtains 51% of the hashing power, which would allow them to double-spend coins, prevent certain transactions from being verified and prevent other miners from earning income.[113] As of 2013 just six mining pools controlled 75% of overall bitcoin hashing power.[113] In 2014 mining pool Ghash.io obtained 51% hashing power which raised significant controversies about the safety of the network. The pool has voluntarily capped their hashing power at 39.99% and requested other pools to act responsibly for the benefit of the whole network.[114]
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