Since bitcoin mining has become a hardware intense and therefore expensive process, most individual miners join a so called mining pool. One of the mining pools you can conect to is BitMinter for example. By providing computing power to their pool you can earn Bitcoins from mining without the need to build your own big mining farm. There are entire communities around Bitcoin mining and besides the fact that you earn Bitcoins it's also fun. You meet new people online and get in-depth knowledge about Bitcoin as a protocol and technology.
What miners are doing with those huge computers and dozens of cooling fans is guessing at the target hash. Miners make these guesses by randomly generating as many "nonces" as possible, as fast as possible. A nonce is short for "number only used once," and the nonce is the key to generating these 64-bit hexadecimal numbers I keep talking about. In Bitcoin mining, a nonce is 32 bits in size--much smaller than the hash, which is 256 bits. The first miner whose nonce generates a hash that is less than or equal to the target hash is awarded credit for completing that block, and is awarded the spoils of 12.5 BTC.
One of the greatest aspects of blockchain technology is the ability for a developer or business to customize it. This means a blockchain can be completely open to the public and allow anyone to join, or it can be totally private, with only certain folks allowed access to the data, or allowed to send and receive payments. Bitcoin is an example of an open-source public blockchain that allows anyone to join, whereas a private blockchain would be perfect for a corporate customer.
In the proof of work system, computers must “prove” that they have done “work” by solving a complex computational math problem. If a computer solves one of these problems, they become eligible to add a block to the blockchain. But the process of adding blocks to the blockchain, what the cryptocurrency world calls “mining,” is not easy. In fact, according to the blockchain news site BlockExplorer, the odds of solving one of these problems on the Bitcoin network were about 1 in 5.8 trillion in February 2019. To solve complex math problems at those odds, computers must run programs that cost them significant amounts of power and energy (read: money).
The reward is not the the only incentive for miners to keep running their hardware. They also get the transaction fees that Bitcoin users pay. Currently, as there is a huge amount of transactions happening within the Bitcoin network, the transaction fees have skyrocketed. Even though the fees are voluntary on the part of the sender, miners will always prioritize transfers with higher transaction fees. So, unless you are willing to pay a rather high fee, your transaction might take a very long time to be processed.
Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer payment network established in 2009 that uses a virtual currency, the bitcoin, to conduct transactions. Unlike currencies issued by nations, Bitcoin is independent of any country or stock exchange and is entirely digital, with no ties to a central bank, company, or organization.[1][2] It is used as an investment and medium of exchange by all members of its network. Getting bitcoins of your own is thus a matter of becoming a part of the Bitcoin network by setting up a bitcoin account and wallet.

Most exchanges accept bank transfer or credit card payments, and some even accept Paypal payments. They’ll also charge you a transaction fee for every trade you make. You can choose from hundreds of crypto exchanges, but the most popular and reputable exchanges are Bitfinex, Bitstamp, Coinbase, and Coinmama. Here’s a list of more popular crypto exchanges.


Because of bitcoin's decentralized nature and its trading on online exchanges located in many countries, regulation of bitcoin has been difficult. However, the use of bitcoin can be criminalized, and shutting down exchanges and the peer-to-peer economy in a given country would constitute a de facto ban.[162] The legal status of bitcoin varies substantially from country to country and is still undefined or changing in many of them. Regulations and bans that apply to bitcoin probably extend to similar cryptocurrency systems.[163]
A blockchain is a record-keeping system where multiple sources validate an entry before it gets added to the chain of data. Once data has been added, it cannot be changed and the record is distributed to multiple places within the network. Adding a new record (known as a block) to the blockchain sequence requires verification by multiple members connected to the blockchain network. These blocks of data are all linked to one another forming the chain. All transactions are public to those in the blockchain, but all individual identities are hidden.
The domain name "bitcoin.org" was registered on 18 August 2008.[15] On 31 October 2008, a link to a paper authored by Satoshi Nakamoto titled Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System[5] was posted to a cryptography mailing list.[16] Nakamoto implemented the bitcoin software as open-source code and released it in January 2009.[17][18][10] Nakamoto's identity remains unknown.[9]
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