It seems as if overnight, the media industry has gotten the blockchain bug. Today, there are events, panels, articles and conversations about how blockchain will save journalism and advertising and marketing. In fact, Adweek has one of its very own. But before we decide whether or not this technology will be media’s savior, we wanted to answer some pretty basic questions. We’re also introducing a weekly blockchain newsletter, which you can sign up for here.
Well, your data is currently held in a centralized database (just like at Equifax). A centralized database is much easier to hack into because it uses one main server. In this case, all the hacker must do to steal the data, is hack the main server. In a blockchain, there is no main server — there is no central point for a hacker to attack! Here’s a great advantage of blockchain explained.
Up to this day, Bitcoin uninterruptedly works as money one person pays another person for goods and services. Once Bitcoin is exchanged, the record of the transaction is publicly recorded onto a ledger known as the blockchain, which other Bitcoin users, known as miners, verify by putting those transactions into a block and adding it to the blockchain after Proof of Work (PoW).

This is going to come off rude but may I suggest you perform some basic proof-reading of your article prior to publication to fix all the grammatical errors (of which there are many) if you wish to teach your audience something new without insulting their intelligence by forcing them to fix your ill-structured sentences to clarify your own writing.


Bob spread his spreadsheet diary over 5,000 computers, which were  all over the world. These computers are called nodes. Every time a transaction occurs it has to be approved by the nodes, each of whom checks its validity. Once every node has checked a transaction there is a sort of electronic vote, as some nodes may think the transaction is valid and others think it is a fraud.
"It's time sensitive, like a yo-yo", said Jeff Garzik, a Bitcoin developer for the payment processor BitPay. It's not mining or investors that are causing the radical highs and lows in the currency's value, it's the media, he said. "Bitcoin's price tends to follow media cycles, not hardware or mining. The difficulty in mining is not the highest correlation in bitcoin value."
It goes further. Ebooks could be fitted with blockchain code. Instead of Amazon taking a cut, and the credit card company earning money on the sale, the books would circulate in encoded form and a successful blockchain transaction would transfer money to the author and unlock the book. Transfer ALL the money to the author, not just meager royalties. You could do this on a book review website like Goodreads, or on your own website. The marketplace Amazon is then unnecessary. Successful iterations could even include reviews and other third-party information about the book.

In Charles Stross' 2013 science fiction novel, Neptune's Brood, the universal interstellar payment system is known as "bitcoin" and operates using cryptography.[227] Stross later blogged that the reference was intentional, saying "I wrote Neptune's Brood in 2011. Bitcoin was obscure back then, and I figured had just enough name recognition to be a useful term for an interstellar currency: it'd clue people in that it was a networked digital currency."[228]

After a block has been added to the end of the blockchain, it is very difficult to go back and alter the contents of the block. That’s because each block contains its own hash, along with the hash of the block before it. Hash codes are created by a math function that turns digital information into a string of numbers and letters. If that information is edited in any way, the hash code changes as well.


A block is record of a new transactions. When a block is completed, it’s added to the chain. Bitcoin owners have the private password (a complex key) to an address on the chain, which is where their ownership is recorded. Crypto-currency proponents like the distributed storage without a middle man — you don’t need a bank to verify the transfer of money or take a cut of the transaction.
There are many Blockchain projects which aim to do this. Bear in mind, however, that there is often not enough storage within Blockchains themselves, but there are decentralized cloud storage solutions available, such as Storj, Sia, Ethereum Swarm and so on. From the user’s perspective they work just like any other cloud storage. The difference is that the content is hosted on various anonymous users’ computers, instead of data centers.

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Network nodes can validate transactions, add them to their copy of the ledger, and then broadcast these ledger additions to other nodes. To achieve independent verification of the chain of ownership each network node stores its own copy of the blockchain.[68] About every 10 minutes, a new group of accepted transactions, called a block, is created, added to the blockchain, and quickly published to all nodes, without requiring central oversight. This allows bitcoin software to determine when a particular bitcoin was spent, which is needed to prevent double-spending. A conventional ledger records the transfers of actual bills or promissory notes that exist apart from it, but the blockchain is the only place that bitcoins can be said to exist in the form of unspent outputs of transactions.[3]:ch. 5
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