Alice wants to use her Bitcoin to buy pizza from Bob. She’d send him her private “key,” a private sequence of letters and numbers, which contains her source transaction of the coins, amount, and Bob’s digital wallet address. That “address” would be another, this time, the public sequence of letters and numbers. Bob scans the “key” with his smartphone to decode it. At the same time, Alice’s transaction is broadcast to all the other network participants (called “nodes”) on her ledger, and, approximately, ten minutes later, is confirmed, through a process of certain technical and business rules called “mining.” This “mining” process gives Bob a score to know whether or not to proceed with Alice’s transaction.


Too much time and effort is currently wasted on identity verification. Using the decentralization of Blockchains, the verification of online identity will be much quicker. Online identity data in a central location will vanish with the use of the Blockchain smart contracts. Computer hackers will no longer have centralized points of vulnerability to attack. Data storage is tamper-proof and incorruptible when backed by Blockchain. All over the world, the Blockchain is leading to big improvements in the verification of identity.
However, the problem is for people residing in countries where there is no Bitcoin exchange and users have no option of transferring funds from their bank accounts to purchase Bitcoins. This makes it really hard for the users to hold Bitcoins now and with the prices surging at a rapid pace, it might be too late for many to get hold of Bitcoins. But that is where we come to rescue. How you may ask. We have come up with other options through which you can buy Bitcoins.
Transparency: even though personal information on blockchain is kept private, the technology itself is almost always open source. That means that users on the blockchain network can modify the code as they see fit, so long as they have a majority of the network’s computational power backing them. Keeping data on the blockchain open source also makes tampering with data that much more difficult. With millions of computers on the blockchain network at any given time, for example, it is unlikely that anyone could make a change without being noticed.
As I mentioned earlier, Bitcoin is not like a typical currency that you keep in your bank. You are responsible for the security of your Bitcoins and that’s why you keep it in a wallet that you have 100% control over. This is done by having the ownership of seed word or private key.  For the first timer, it may sound very technical, but it is actually easy to understand and learn.
Blockchain does not store any of its information in a central location. Instead, the blockchain is copied and spread across a network of computers. Whenever a new block is added to the blockchain, every computer on the network updates its blockchain to reflect the change. By spreading that information across a network, rather than storing it in one central database, blockchain becomes more difficult to tamper with. If a copy of the blockchain fell into the hands of a hacker, only a single copy of information, rather than the entire network, would be compromised.
Computing power is often bundled together or "pooled" to reduce variance in miner income. Individual mining rigs often have to wait for long periods to confirm a block of transactions and receive payment. In a pool, all participating miners get paid every time a participating server solves a block. This payment depends on the amount of work an individual miner contributed to help find that block.[86]
On 3 January 2009, the bitcoin network was created when Nakamoto mined the first block of the chain, known as the genesis block.[19][20] Embedded in the coinbase of this block was the following text: "The Times 03/Jan/2009 Chancellor on brink of second bailout for banks."[10] This note has been interpreted as both a timestamp and a comment on the instability caused by fractional-reserve banking.[21]:18
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