Accept bitcoins as payment. A number of businesses and services now accept bitcoins as payment. If you do any online services, you can also accept bitcoins as payment. Accepting payment in bitcoins can be beneficial if you're a small business or independent professional (like a dentist), because it does not cost money to accept bitcoins as payment.[17] You can also avoid chargebacks, or consumer disputes with their credit card issuer that lose you money, because bitcoin transactions are irreversible.[18]
Say John buys a lemonade from Sandy’s lemonade stand. On John’s copy of the blockchain, he marks that transaction down: “John bought Lemonade from Sandy, $2.” His copy gets spread around town to all the lemonade stands and lemonade buyers, who add this transaction to their own copies. By the time John has finished drinking that lemonade, everyone’s blockchain ledger shows that he bought his lemonade from Sandy for $2.
^ Beikverdi, A.; Song, J. (June 2015). Trend of centralization in Bitcoin's distributed network. 2015 IEEE/ACIS 16th International Conference on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, Networking and Parallel/Distributed Computing (SNPD). pp. 1–6. doi:10.1109/SNPD.2015.7176229. ISBN 978-1-4799-8676-7. Archived from the original on 26 January 2018.
Transactions on the blockchain network are approved by a network of thousands or millions of computers. This removes almost all human involvement in the verification process, resulting in less human error and a more accurate record of information. Even if a computer on the network were to make a computational mistake, the error would only be made to one copy of the blockchain. In order for that error to spread to the rest of the blockchain, it would need to be made by at least 51% of the network’s computers — a near impossibility.
The peer-to-peer network structure in cryptocurrencies is structured according to the consensus mechanism that they are utilizing. For cryptos like Bitcoin and Ethereum which uses a normal proof-of-work consensus mechanism (Ethereum will eventually move on to Proof of Stake), all the nodes have the same privilege. The idea is to create an egalitarian network. The nodes are not given any special privileges, however, their functions and degree of participation may differ. There is no centralized server/entity, nor is there any hierarchy. It is a flat topology.
In the past when a claim is made, all checks would be carried out by humans, which can be time-consuming and leaves room for human error. This will become unnecessary, as checks to ensure that all criteria have been met, and can be done automatically using the Blockchain. Once all obligations are fulfilled, the resulting payout is automatic. This can all be done using minimum human involvement.
An early example, OpenBazaar uses the blockchain to create a peer-to-peer eBay. Download the app onto your computing device, and you can transact with OpenBazzar vendors without paying transaction fees. The “no rules” ethos of the protocol means that personal reputation will be even more important to business interactions than it currently is on eBay.
Think of it like the early days of the internet. The world of blockchain technology is still the wild, Wild West. By early June 2018, the total value of initial coin offerings had already outpaced the previous year. And while the past year has seen a record number of ICOs, some have been legitimate, but others are sketchier. In July 2018, for example, two Nevada men settled a lawsuit by the Securities and Exchange Commission over illegally profiting from an ICO after they made about $1.4 million in 10 days by selling shares of a company called UBI Blockchain Internet.

Transactions are verified by network nodes through cryptography and recorded in a public distributed ledger called a blockchain. Bitcoin was invented by an unknown person or group of people using the name Satoshi Nakamoto[9] and released as open-source software in 2009.[10] Bitcoins are created as a reward for a process known as mining. They can be exchanged for other currencies,[11] products, and services. Research produced by the University of Cambridge estimates that in 2017, there were 2.9 to 5.8 million unique users using a cryptocurrency wallet, most of them using bitcoin.[12]

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