Given the size of the sums involved, even the few days that the money is in transit can carry significant costs and risks for banks. Santander, a European bank, put the potential savings at $20 billion a year. Capgemini, a French consultancy, estimates that consumers could save up to $16 billion in banking and insurance fees each year through blockchain-based applications.

Readers may remember CCN’s coverage of PaidBooks.com, a site run by the friendly folks behind Bitcoin Aliens. It has the same functionality as a regular faucet, but instead pays users for reading classic books. It is one of the more interesting and engaging methods of giving away free money, as it gives the user the opportunity to engage in more ways than simply getting around a CAPTCHA and pressing a couple of buttons. Since we first wrote about PaidBooks, they seem to have converted to Bitcoin Cash via a service called AirDrips. BCH is easily converted to Bitcoin, if desired, via services like ShapeShift. You create an accout at AirDrips and then you are able to read books and get paid. They also offer other similar things such as watching videos for money.
The domain name "bitcoin.org" was registered on 18 August 2008.[15] On 31 October 2008, a link to a paper authored by Satoshi Nakamoto titled Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System[5] was posted to a cryptography mailing list.[16] Nakamoto implemented the bitcoin software as open-source code and released it in January 2009.[17][18][10] Nakamoto's identity remains unknown.[9]
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