The use of bitcoin by criminals has attracted the attention of financial regulators, legislative bodies, law enforcement, and the media.[217] In the United States, the FBI prepared an intelligence assessment,[218] the SEC issued a pointed warning about investment schemes using virtual currencies,[217] and the U.S. Senate held a hearing on virtual currencies in November 2013.[219] The U.S. government claimed that bitcoin was used to facilitate payments related to Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections.[220]
* In a supply chain auditing blockchain application (https://blockgeeks.com/guides/what-is-blockchain-technology/), it’s said “a Provenance pilot project ensures that fish sold in Sushi restaurants in Japan has been sustainably harvested by its suppliers in Indonesia”. I am wondering how this can be done. How can blockchain validate the origin of the fish? Or an ethical diamond? There is no reliable IDs on the fish or the diamonds.
Blockchain technology uses an algorithm to assign a cryptographic hash (a unique string of letters and numbers—also sometimes called the “digital fingerprint”) to each block. In addition to the hash, each block contains timestamped sets of prior transactions, plus the hash of the previous block—which is what creates the immutable link between sequential blocks in the chain.
In the context of security, both transparency of the system and immutability of the data stored on blockchain comes into play. Immutability in computer science refers to something that cannot be changed. Once data has been written to a blockchain, it becomes virtually immutable. This doesn’t mean that the data cannot be changed – it just means that it would require extreme computational effort and collaboration to change it and then also, it would be very difficult to cloak it.
Lend directly to someone you know. This allows you to assess personally, whether you regard the borrower as trustworthy. Then the two of you only need to agree on the terms like duration and interest rate and off you go. The drawback is, however, that you probably will not have too many acquaintances who match your amount, duration and interest rate requirements. But it's a nice way to earn Bitcoins.
According to The New York Times, libertarians and anarchists were attracted to the idea. Early bitcoin supporter Roger Ver said: "At first, almost everyone who got involved did so for philosophical reasons. We saw bitcoin as a great idea, as a way to separate money from the state."[120] The Economist describes bitcoin as "a techno-anarchist project to create an online version of cash, a way for people to transact without the possibility of interference from malicious governments or banks".[123]
One obvious hurdle is the adoption of the technology. To deploy blockchain, financial institutions would essentially have to abandon their current networks and start anew. Trying to integrate the current payment networks with blockchain could prove exceptionally challenging -- to the point where some businesses don't even bother trying to do so. It's also still unclear, with the exception of bitcoin (CCY: BTC-USD), the world's most popular cryptocurrency, if any blockchain aside from bitcoin could survive being scaled to handle a lot of transactions.

The MIT project Enigma understands that user privacy is the key precondition for creating of a personal data marketplace. Enigma uses cryptographic techniques to allow individual data sets to be split between nodes, and at the same time run bulk computations over the data group as a whole. Fragmenting the data also makes Enigma scalable (unlike those blockchain solutions where data gets replicated on every node). A Beta launch is promised within the next six months.


I can see that blockchain has at least one vulnerability. Sure – decentralization and reconciliation with encryption is fine. But the one vulnerability is the interconnecting network. You foul that up and your blockchain paradigm is now vulnerable. Each node could then be compromised so that reconciliation is impossible. Blockchain does not accomodate the vulnerabilities of the infrastructure which it is using.
Transactions are verified by network nodes through cryptography and recorded in a public distributed ledger called a blockchain. Bitcoin was invented by an unknown person or group of people using the name Satoshi Nakamoto[9] and released as open-source software in 2009.[10] Bitcoins are created as a reward for a process known as mining. They can be exchanged for other currencies,[11] products, and services. Research produced by the University of Cambridge estimates that in 2017, there were 2.9 to 5.8 million unique users using a cryptocurrency wallet, most of them using bitcoin.[12]
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