Blockchain can also, depending on the circumstance, be very energy dependent, and therefore costly. When transactions are being verified (which we're going to talk about in the next section), it's possible that a lot of electricity can be used. This is the case in point with bitcoin, which is why so few cryptocurrency miners actually find that validating transactions on bitcoin's blockchain is worthwhile (and profitable). 
The screenshot below, taken from the site Blockchain.info, might help you put all this information together at a glance. You are looking at a summary of everything that happened when block #490163 was mined. The nonce that generated the "winning" hash was 731511405. The target hash is shown on top. The term "Relayed by: Antpool" refers to the fact that this particular block was completed by AntPool, one of the more successful mining pools. As you see here, their contribution to the Bitcoin community is that they confirmed 1768 transactions for this block. If you really want to see all 1768 of those transactions for this block, go to this page and scroll down to the heading "Transactions."
The price of bitcoins has gone through cycles of appreciation and depreciation referred to by some as bubbles and busts.[153] In 2011, the value of one bitcoin rapidly rose from about US$0.30 to US$32 before returning to US$2.[154] In the latter half of 2012 and during the 2012–13 Cypriot financial crisis, the bitcoin price began to rise,[155] reaching a high of US$266 on 10 April 2013, before crashing to around US$50.[156] On 29 November 2013, the cost of one bitcoin rose to a peak of US$1,242.[157] In 2014, the price fell sharply, and as of April remained depressed at little more than half 2013 prices. As of August 2014 it was under US$600.[158] During their time as bitcoin developers, Gavin Andresen[159] and Mike Hearn[160] warned that bubbles may occur.
The domain name "bitcoin.org" was registered on 18 August 2008.[15] On 31 October 2008, a link to a paper authored by Satoshi Nakamoto titled Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System[5] was posted to a cryptography mailing list.[16] Nakamoto implemented the bitcoin software as open-source code and released it in January 2009.[17][18][10] Nakamoto's identity remains unknown.[9]
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