Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer version of electronic cash that allows payments to be sent directly from one party to another without going through a financial institution. The network timestamps transactions by hashing them into an ongoing chain of hash-based proof-of-work, forming a record that cannot be changed without redoing the proof-of-work. – Satoshi Nakamoto
Bitcoin, along with other cryptocurrencies, has been identified as an economic bubble by at least eight Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences laureates, including Robert Shiller,[189] Joseph Stiglitz,[190] and Richard Thaler.[191][13] Noted Keyensian economist Paul Krugman wrote in his New York Times column criticizing bitcoin, calling it a bubble and a fraud;[192] and professor Nouriel Roubini of New York University called bitcoin the "mother of all bubbles."[193] Central bankers, including former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan,[194] investors such as Warren Buffett,[195][196] and George Soros[197] have stated similar views, as have business executives such as Jamie Dimon and Jack Ma.[198]
The incredibly low-cost days of mining bitcoin, which only lasted a couple years, were days where one bitcoin was so cheap that it financially made sense to mine them at a very low cost instead of buying them. For context, the first exchange rate given to bitcoin was in October 2009, 10 months after the first block was mined. The rate, established by the now-defunct New Liberty Standard exchange, gave the value of a bitcoin at US $1=1309.03 BTC. It was calculated using an equation that includes the cost of electricity to run a computer that generated bitcoins. This was the period of time where bitcoins, which were looked at as little more than a newly created internet novelty, could be mined in large quantities using an average computer.
Think of it like the early days of the internet. The world of blockchain technology is still the wild, Wild West. By early June 2018, the total value of initial coin offerings had already outpaced the previous year. And while the past year has seen a record number of ICOs, some have been legitimate, but others are sketchier. In July 2018, for example, two Nevada men settled a lawsuit by the Securities and Exchange Commission over illegally profiting from an ICO after they made about $1.4 million in 10 days by selling shares of a company called UBI Blockchain Internet.
The receiver of the first bitcoin transaction was cypherpunk Hal Finney, who created the first reusable proof-of-work system (RPOW) in 2004.[22] Finney downloaded the bitcoin software on its release date, and on 12 January 2009 received ten bitcoins from Nakamoto.[23][24] Other early cypherpunk supporters were creators of bitcoin predecessors: Wei Dai, creator of b-money, and Nick Szabo, creator of bit gold.[25] In 2010, the first known commercial transaction using bitcoin occurred when programmer Laszlo Hanyecz bought two Papa John's pizzas for 10,000 bitcoin.[26]
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